Tonya Sisler has a Bachelor’s Degree from the University of South Carolina in Journalism and has worked for 15+ years in management. She has also completed a proofreading certification and is currently a professional writer.

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Brad Larson has been in the insurance industry for more than a dozen years. He started out as a claims adjuster for a national carrier. He has since switched to the agency side of the business. Brad is licensed in all P&C lines.

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Reviewed by Brad Larsen
Licensed Auto Insurance Agent

UPDATED: Mar 13, 2020

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In a nutshell...

  • The purpose of no-fault car insurance laws are to avoid the determination of guilt
  • In America, there are only 13 states who currently operate under no-fault car insurance laws
  • No-fault insurance was designed to protect drivers from all liability

No fault car insurance is a popular term in the car insurance industry but less than 25 percent of states actually have no-fault car insurance laws.

The purpose of no-fault car insurance laws is to avoid the determination of guilt (who was at-fault) in order to expedite claims handling, reduce the amount of car accident litigation.

However, in recent years, we have seen more states revert back to traditional tort laws for no logical reason.

Ready to compare no-fault car insurance quotes?  Enter your zip code above to get started for FREE!

What states operate under no-fault car insurance laws?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsDvQu1qYpY

“In America, there are only 13 states who currently operate under no-fault car insurance laws – three of which drivers actually have an option to choose between no-fault coverage and traditional law at the time a policy is issued”

The states which have no-fault auto insurance laws currently in place are:

  • New York
  • Massachusetts
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Kansas
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • North Dakota
  • Utah
  • Puerto Rico

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The states where drivers have a no-fault car insurance option at the time a policy is purchased are:

  • Kentucky
  • New Jersey
  • Pennsylvania

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Can I be personally liable for a car accident with no-fault car insurance?

No-fault car insurance was not designed to protect drivers from all liability but to simplify the claims handling process and number of nuisance lawsuits resulting from minor injuries.

This is why understanding car insurance is critical as most state minimum requirements offer only limited levels of policy coverage and if damages should exceed how much insurance you have then yes, it’s very possible to be personally liable for the rest.

If you drive without car insurance, it’s even worse. You can be personally liable for ALL damages and subject to heavy fines and penalties by the state.

Driving with excessive speed, using extreme negligence or even not wearing your seatbelt are all reasons for a car accident attorney to file suit or an insurance company to deny a claim.

Be responsible and understand the terms of your auto insurance before operating any vehicle. Compare car insurance quotes today! Enter your zip code below to get started for FREE!